Mobile Responsive Web Design Challenges in 2021

RWD major challenge these days is testing your content on all Mobile browsers and provide a seamless user experience. The desktop side of RWD that will fit and scale inside a desktop browser is relatively easy as there are no more that 3-5 different types of browsers.

On the mobile side, its entirely a different story as there are 10 + mobile browsers out there in the wild (default + installed). The user might view the website appropriately in the desktop version, but when the same website is viewed through his mobile phone, it’ll look odd and janky. What you need is a “device” plan of attack. Know which device classes you intend to support before you start to code and create content.

Have both your lowest common denominator devices and your high-end device designs before you begin to code. Try to visualize a way to create both versions from one code base and Test on different mobile devices from the beginning to the end to ensure that your incremental work will display correctly in the intended devices. Its good to have a small design lab where you can set up all these mobile devices and test your content. Designing and supporting multiple mobile displays takes time and patience. Responsive Design includes the use of CSS3 Media Queries, which is supported by almost all modern browsers and it reactively determines the screen size of a device and then renders the content appropriately on the screen layout. With a set of media queries, you will be able to display different layouts on different devices.

After successfully making your website responsive, you need to perform responsive test online on multiple devices like Mobile Phones, Tablets, Laptops, Desktops to ensure the responsive web design and that content and images are adapting themselves as per the screen size in which they are being viewed on. A good plan is half of your success. This is why planning ahead every little part of your responsive website design is crucial.

Financial Advisors: Optimizing Your Website for Mobile in 2021

First thing to do is ask whether mobile visitors are interacting with your website differently than desktop users? It’s important for your website to work well on mobile devices, so if you haven’t yet invested in making your website mobile-friendly, it’s time to do so

Mobile optimized websites tend up higher in search results. With the rise if modern more powerful smartphones and tablets, mobile searches make up more than half of searches on Google.com.

  • Go into Google Analytics and segment out the mobile traffic. The mobile segment might include Tablet traffic so be aware of that figure. Once you have the data, focus on landing pages, conversion rate, and where people leave the conversion funnel. Optimize accordingly.

Responsive web design has made it possible to create sites that work across all platforms on an even play level. Mobile optimization has begun to gain credence as a potentially preferable strategy now in 2021. Instead of simply compressing and slightly rearranging the content on the screen, you design the entire experience for smaller screens. A good basic mobile optimized website should include the following:

  • Keep layouts simple and invest in responsive theme templates.
  • Use large, mobile-friendly calls-to-action and links.
  • Use large, easy-to-read text.
  • Keep forms as short as possible.
  • Clearly display your CTAs. Your CTA needs to focus on that primary goal.
  • Avoid large blocks of text and choose the right font.
  • Use large, clear images or buttons and reduce file sizes. Buttons need to be large enough to be tapped with a finger. Make sure you keep enough space between buttons so someone doesn’t accidentally click the wrong one.
  • Simplify your menus including the Search function.

Finally, prioritize speed. The best way to keep your page speed loading time as low as possible is by simplifying your design.

Tip: Its always a good idea to add a mobile XML sitemap and submit it to Google and Bing. Although, if the website is responsive, it’s not necessary to have the separate XML sitemaps for Mobile. I don’t think it’s not required as per Google’s guideline. When there are pages of similar content on desktop and mobile, they need to be interlinked by canonical tags so that google knows what is the alternative page for that, and automatically crawl and give equal importance to the other page which is still not there on the sitemap.

Responsive Web Design Challenges = Mobile

RWD major challenge these days is testing your content on all Mobile browsers. The desktop side of RWD that will fit and scale inside a desktop browser is relatively easy as there are no more that 6-7 different types of browsers.

On the mobile side, its entirely a different story as there are 40 + mobile browsers out there in the wild (default + installable). What you need is a “device” plan of attack. Know which device classes you intend to support before you start to code and create content. Have both your lowest common denominator devices and your high-end device designs before you begin to code. Try to visualize a way to create both versions from one code base and Test on different mobile devices from the beginning to the end to ensure that your incremental work will display correctly in the intended devices. Its good to have a small design lab where you can set up all these mobile devices and test your content. Designing and supporting multiple mobile displays takes time and patience.

When Optimizing Your Mobile Site….

First thing to do is ask whether mobile visitors are interacting with your site differently than desktop users?

> Go into Google Anaytics and segment out the mobile traffic. The mobile segment might include Tablet traffic so be aware of that figure. Once you have the data, focus on landing pages, conversion rate, and where people leave the conversion funnel. Optimize accordingly.

Best practice tip: Its always a good idea to add a mobile XML site map and submit it to Google and Bing.

Mobile Apps

Does your company or business have a mobile strategy? If not, look into building a mobile app! Both for Apple and Android. There are numerous tools out there to build these apps as well as fantastic freelancers that can help. Depending on your product or service, a mobile app is value-add.

Quick Digital Marketing Campaign Basics

Planning. Who is your target market? Which ways are you going to promote it? Be social-Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn? Pinterest? Google? Etc.Possible uses of QR codes? SMS mobile promotion?

Keywords.You will need the list for # hashtags, long tail keywords, etc.

Competitors. List top competitors. List their # hashtags, social media accounts, blogs.

Website. Get your website ready. SEO. Conversion paths. Landing pages. Evaluate your website vs competitors. Make notes on keywords, hotspots (clicks) on your website and competitors, check and build your back links according to your
new campaign.

Measure. Measure. Measure. Measure results! Measure “mentions” and social media engagement. measure conversions. Retweets. Likes. Comments. Good tools include Radian6, PostRank, Trackur, Social Mention, TwentyFeet, Google Analytics, Google Trends.

Search Engines Are Where Your Potential Customers Live

1/3 of US consumers spend three or more hours online every day. Source: The Media Audit, Oct. 2010

The average US Internet user views 2,750 web pages per month. Source: The Nielsen company, Jan. 2011

10.3 Billion Searches are conducted every month on Google. Source: Comscore, Aug. 2010

Search Engine

70% of the links search users click on are organic – not paid. Source: Marketing Sherpa, Feb. 2007

Search engine websites are the most visited websites with 77% of smartphone users citing this, followed by social networking, retail and video sharing websites. Source: Ipsos OTX, an independent market research firm, 2010

Nine out of ten smartphone searches results in an action (purchasing, visiting a business, etc.). Source: Ipsos OTX, an independent market research firm, 2010